"Wealth will increasingly be defined by our ability to go offline whenever we want." - Fernando Gros
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Blog // Travel
April 6, 2006

Has Apple Gone Mad?

Well, the short answer is No. The blogosphere is awash with opinion about Apple’s recent announcement that only can you run Windows (or Windoze) on a new Intel-powered Mac, but that Apple will provide you with software, called Bootcamp, to help you do it. Whilst some voices welcome the move (with varied reservations), others are […]

Well, the short answer is No.

The blogosphere is awash with opinion about Apple’s recent announcement that only can you run Windows (or Windoze) on a new Intel-powered Mac, but that Apple will provide you with software, called Bootcamp, to help you do it. Whilst some voices welcome the move (with varied reservations), others are declaiming the end of the world as we know it.

Sometimes it takes someone in the family to say it, so here goes; Apple users can be cultish at times. Perhaps the worst are the serious longterm users, the hardcases that can trace an unbroken lineage back to the original Mac, or even back to the Apple II. Those folk should, in my opinion welcome this move. The second most irrational are those who have recently switched to Apple, primarily for “lifestyle” reasons (regardless of what they may say). I’m sure they would be disillusioned by Apple’s recent move. Oh Well.

There are three reasons why serious Apple users should welcome this move. First, by premptively releasing the software to run Windows, Apple has beaten the hackers and retained some control over the firmware. This is good both for the security and stability of the Mac OS.

Second, Apple’s big business risk, down the line, has to do withthe hardware/software enmeshing. Apple are already facing lawsuits in Europe over iTunes and could face more that would force them to unbundle the OS (the very last thing apple would want). By opening up to Windows they can keep the Mac OS in tact since the user always has the option to run another OS.

Third, some folks (like L) are forced to run Windows at work, despite an interest in OSX for media applications. I’m sure they would welcome the opportunity to buy a Macbook and run Windows at work and OSX at home. For recording studios this would allow them to have dual boot systems, with one hardware path, an Apple path.

All three of these reasons make sound business sense for Apple and potentially more hardware sales. Maybe a LOT more sales. This is good for serious Apple users because it gives the company more control over its destiny, which means more control over the professional applications. Also, this is good news for the share price, and of course, real Apple fans are Apple shareholders as well.

Responses
Toni 17 years ago

Agreed. This can only help the mac cause, although it may be a little late.

There’s a few flies in the OS ointment though – who would buy a slow and relatively expensive piece of hardware for gaming (one of the reasons put forward for people to want a dual boot mac) in windows when gamers really want cutting edge hardware? Also you just KNOW that people running mac and windows OSs are going to have apps specific to each system that they will wish would work together at the same time. Businesses certainly won’t be affected – the bottom line there is cost, and with the hardware more expensive there won’t be an incentive, while the support stuff will need additional training.

But it IS a good move. I grew up on apple IIs and switched to Macs around 1990 after being trained to use ‘smart’ (a misnomer if ever there was) on an XT I was really impressed at how I could just sit down and work using a mac with no training. By windows 95 the advantage was over, and it was impossible to justify the double cost of a mac over a medium level PC, not to mention the increased cost of software (about 3 X higher at that time).

The mac has never really had enough advantage since, but this will reduce the reasons for not buying one and will help win borderline sales.

Fernando Gros 17 years ago

Without a doubt the gaming market is lost to Apple. In fact, I would be dissapointed if they even went after it.

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