"Wealth will increasingly be defined by our ability to go offline whenever we want." - Fernando Gros
0 items in your cart
$0
Blog // Thoughts
August 21, 2005

On Getting Christian Parenthood Totally Wrong

Russell D. Moore’s ideological rant, Why I’m Raising Violent 4 Year-Olds has generated a fair bit of discussion, most notably at Moral Contradictions, Howie Luvzus and Mainstream Baptist. Moore is justifying taking his 4 year old sons to see the latest Star Wars film as a pretext to discussing the proper role of violence within […]

Russell D. Moore’s ideological rant, Why I’m Raising Violent 4 Year-Olds has generated a fair bit of discussion, most notably at Moral Contradictions, Howie Luvzus and Mainstream Baptist.

Moore is justifying taking his 4 year old sons to see the latest Star Wars film as a pretext to discussing the proper role of violence within a Christian worldview. Moore’s aim is to “raise up violent sons” who are familiar with ‘blessedly violent bedtime stories” (i.e., the scriptures). Moore’s action are informed by his theological cosmology,

“I want them to understand that the Christian life is not a Hallmark Channel version of baptized sentimentality. Instead, it is a cosmic battle between an evil dragon and the child of the woman, an ancient warfare that now includes all who belong to the Child of the Promise (Rev 12).”

Sorry Mr Moore, but the basic point of departure for my faith and faith I hope to pass onto my 4 year child has nothing to do with dragons or anthropomorhising religious poetry. Moreover, the basic posture of that faith is not violence, or warfare. Finally, I see it as quite dangerous to present faith to a young child as the stuff of fairytale and adventure, because in time they will grow up and grow out of that worldview. In time, fantasy will be relegated to it’s rightful place in the realm of fiction and with it, religious belief and impulse as well.

[tags] Parenting, Christian Ethics [/tags]

Tagged ,
2
Responses
Jon 17 years ago

Fernando, precisely what I was thinking. I was chatting with a professor after class just today about this broader issue as well – he’s a NT guy, focusing on intertestamental history and context, and being German he confessed to knowing all too well what it means for a church to fail at passing their faith on to their children – and he commented that one of the most profound mistakes we make as believers in seeking to pass our faith on to our children is to couch our teaching in the language of fairytale rather than taking advantage of the fact that our faith is rooted in a profound sense of history and place – and as you noted, when fairy tales and Santa Claus are abandoned the rest of the “myths” often quickly follow. He commented that one of the best investments a parent or children’s teacher could make is a big, colorful, easy to read map that can help children place the “ground” of the bible in the context of the world in which they live as opposed to “once upon a time in a land far, far away.”

Matthew Kruse 17 years ago

Violence is too strong of a word, but raising sons who are tough, courageous, and not afraid of a fight is a godly thing, especially if they are going to preach the Gospel (see Acts 20 and Paul’s metaphors to Timothy (a pastor) to fight like a soldier, train like an athlete, and work like a farmer.). Also, yes… Christianity is all about God’s hand in actual history… the incarnation is one of our doctrines that so brings this home… God showed up in flesh in a specific culture… but there is also a transcendance and mystery and wonder to God that you can’t draw on a map but should be a part of our faith and the faith we pass on to our kids.

But I’m agreed that it’s not violence or fairy tale… rather courage and mystery I’d be getting at.

Leave a comment

Enter your and your to join the mailing list.