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Blog // Sounds
December 6, 2005

Finding An Old Solo

I was going through CD collection today and stumbled upon this Disc from 1994. This was a worship CD for the church I was then playing guitar with and whilst some of the songs are well written, listening back to it brought a lot of mixed emotions. In many ways it was a case study […]

I was going through CD collection today and stumbled upon this Disc from 1994. This was a worship CD for the church I was then playing guitar with and whilst some of the songs are well written, listening back to it brought a lot of mixed emotions. In many ways it was a case study of what can go wrong with a recording project when its goals are not clearly defined. The final product, sadly, was neither a record of the live worship sound of the church from those days (which was quite good) nor was it a showcase of the songwriting and musical performance, which also had a lot going for it. In fact, in my opinion, the project was hijacked by the studio to create something that in the end, hardly anyone really wanted to own. I’ve never managed to be able listen to more than two consecutive tracks without getting very frustrated with it and today was no exception.

The title track (with a Neil Smith on vocals), was an example of what went wrong with the album. The demo track presented a solid song that was synth-oriented, but the composer and arranger idea was always to make it more guitar driven and with a natural open vocal. However, the final result had the guitar mixed way back and loads of effects drenching the vocals, which was a post-production call made by the studio owner, without input from the project leader. Hmmm…

Anyway, here is the solo from that track (remastered by me this morning).

Technorati Tags: Worship, Recording, Music Production

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