"Wealth will increasingly be defined by our ability to go offline whenever we want." - Fernando Gros
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Blog // Thoughts
December 20, 2006

English Sport’s Eight Deadly Sins

In the wake of England’s catastrophic failure to regain the Ashes, there has been a lot of introspection and analysis in the British press. The best I’ve read so far is this piece on the BBC, looking at eight suggestions from “Humphrey Walters, who was part of Clive Woodward’s backroom staff during their 2003 World […]

In the wake of England’s catastrophic failure to regain the Ashes, there has been a lot of introspection and analysis in the British press. The best I’ve read so far is this piece on the BBC, looking at eight suggestions from “Humphrey Walters, who was part of Clive Woodward’s backroom staff during their 2003 World Cup.”

Can you guess what I was thinking reading down that list? No surrpise, but I was wondering how well the eight points mapped out on the failures of the institutional church during the 20th century. It seemed interesting that each issue was not just a criticism, but a tangible way to improve processes and srtuctures.

If I had a little more time, I would tease that out a little. But until then, I’d be keen to see if anyone else sees some connections here. Comments please.

Responses
Dana Ames 16 years ago

Not a big sports fan, but do like your connection with the c20 institutional church… What struck me as I read was the implications for pastors, staying with a congregation over the long haul, enthusiasm, sometimes the wrong person is called up for the job, etc. Not sure if a direct correlation can or should be made to the business world, but it does continue to make me wonder what we expect of everybody in a church, not just pastors.

Dana Ames
Ukiah California

Fernando Gros 16 years ago

Thanks Dana. I’m not a fan of drawing too close to business models, but this little list struck me as a little different. Some things, like visible enthusiam, not being complancent and keeping everyone “in the game” seemed quite fruitful points for reflection.

brodie 16 years ago

I’m also not a fan of drawing too close on business models when it comes to church. What did however strike me was how football clubs etc., take the supporters for granted and assume their unending loyalty. I guess the church has done this, and perhaps at times we still do.

I find a tension here as I think faithfulness / committment is key to being a follower of Jesus and that includes faithfulness / committment to a particular community of Christ followers, i.e. a local Church. For me this is a guard against a consumeristic approach to church. Yet it can lead to complacency in the leadership if we don’t listen to pur people, if we work in isolation rather than journeying with the people we serve.

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