"Wealth will increasingly be defined by our ability to go offline whenever we want." - Fernando Gros
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Blog // Sounds
September 22, 2006

Ecclesiology And Collective Action Problems

I’ve been thinking a lot about collective action problems and in particular how local churches and denominations represent examples of collective action (yes, including the prisoner’s dilema and the problem of freeriding). If you are unfamilar with these ideas, check out the wiki and this short article. In particular, I’m wondering if this line of […]

I’ve been thinking a lot about collective action problems and in particular how local churches and denominations represent examples of collective action (yes, including the prisoner’s dilema and the problem of freeriding).

If you are unfamilar with these ideas, check out the wiki and this short article.

In particular, I’m wondering if this line of thought might be helpful in thinking aout the tensions in Baptist forms of church and denominational organisation. Also, some of the practical concerns I have about emerging church ecclesiology are in terms of addressing collective action problems.

It’s a big issue and my guess is I’ll be thinking for a while before I can write more substantially on the subject. In the meantime, you’ll at least know why these terms are cropping up in posts and comments.

Oh and if anyone has any links to books or papers linking theology with collective action problems, please get in touch.

[tags] Ecclesiology, Collective Action Problem [/tags]

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Responses
Linz 16 years ago

It’s been a while since I did any reading in this area, but my recollection is that Douglas Hofstadter had a few chapters on game theory, iterative prisoner’s dilemna’s etc. in “Metamagaical Themas” and there was also a book on A-life by Stephen Levy which addressed these issues in the context of different defection strategies and evolutionary approaches to generating algorithms.

Fernando Gros 16 years ago

Hey Linz, thanks for the comment. Two great references – thanks.

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