"Wealth will increasingly be defined by our ability to go offline whenever we want." - Fernando Gros
0 items in your cart
$0
Blog // Thoughts
November 18, 2006

The Guardian

Last night I have the dubious pleasure of watching The Guardian, the new film starring Kevin Costner and the apparently semi-famous Ashton Kutcher. For the most part, the film is typical of the its genre – crusty old timer meets troubled new recruit, tough training sees some fail but the underdog get through, new recruit […]

Last night I have the dubious pleasure of watching The Guardian, the new film starring Kevin Costner and the apparently semi-famous Ashton Kutcher. For the most part, the film is typical of the its genre – crusty old timer meets troubled new recruit, tough training sees some fail but the underdog get through, new recruit comes good, old timer seeks redemption, etc. This film is Top Gun with helicopters and diving gear, or Officer and a Gentlemen without, well, either the officers or the gentlemen.

For the most part it is fine, mildly amusing action-stuff. Up until the last, third or so, which is probably the most asinine ending to a film I have seen in a very long time. The problem is that after delivering an unspectacular military genre film, The Guardian suddenly lurches in search of some deeper meaning, some greater exploration of the human soul and it is here where the wheels really come off. As a predictable action film it’s perfectly fine, if not for a Friday night, then certainly as a DVD or plane movie. As a complex romantic drama and exploration of the deeper reaches of loyalty and heroism is borderline laughable.

The interesting thing for me is that this is a film one could, if inclined to do so use as a springboard for a discussion about themes like mentoring, or redemption – the kind of stuff that might interest theologians of culture. However, it is seemed fraught to do that with a poor film, particularly one like The Guardian that has so clearly been revised with a view to add levels of meaning that the narrative simply can’t sustain. Watch it for a lesson in the kinds of films we should only ever quote with extreme care and circumspection.

[tags] The Guardian [/tags]

Tagged ,
0

Leave a comment

Enter your and your to join the mailing list.